ZIF ? LIF? WTF? confused ? you should be...

most pATA (parallel ATA) 1.8" HDD (hard disk drive) used in mini computers have this connector:


most SSD and HDD makers call this a ZIF (zero insertion force) connector.
in most cases, the cable inserted is 0.25mm (deep), (the black lip clamps down on the cable after insertion).

some more examples of 1.8" hard disk drives: here


48GB used by Sony in computers like TZ and UX
in most cases, the cable inserted is 0.25mm (deep)


[MK8009GAH] 80GB 1.8" HDD
in most cases, the cable inserted is 0.25mm (deep)

some more examples of 1.8" hard disk drives: here


 

LIF (low insertion force) connectors are a little different,
the cables are typically 0.5mm (deep)
these are quite rare, and you will probably not have a device like this,
but check to be sure!


this HDD is a Hitachi 1.8" it has a LIF connector.
(yes, it's sometimes called a ZIF!)

some SSD / part makers may label LIF as ZIF, and ZIF as LIF...
the reasons are not clear, but basically these devices were never meant to be touched or replaced by customers.
(so no real rule about naming is followed exactly)


For our purposes:
0.25 mm cable = ZIF
0.5 mm cable = LIF

this (by most maker's definition) is a ZIF connector:

figure Z

this (by most maker's definition) is a LIF connector:

figure L


now, to confuse things even more:
by correct definition of the TLA (three letter acronym)
LIF = low insertion force, would be [figure Z]
which requires "low force" to insert the cable, which is then clamped in place.
and
ZIF = zero insertion force, would be [figure L ]
which requires almost "zero force" to insert the cable, which is then clamped in place.

now, the good news:
RunCore is producing SSD with both LIF and ZIF connectors!
so to be 100% sure, check your actual HDD connector, and order the correct SSD.


some more examples of 1.8" hard disk drives: here